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Comics of the Week #399

Every week we feature a set of comics created exclusively for WDD. The content revolves around web design, blogging and funny situations that we encounter in our daily lives as designers. These great cartoons are created by Jerry King, an award-winning cartoonist who’s one of the most published, prolific and versatile cartoonists in the world […]

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A Collection of Interesting Facts about CSS Grid Layout

A few weeks ago I held a CSS Grid Layout workshop. Since I’m, like most of us, also pretty new to the topic, I learned a lot while preparing the slides and demos.
I decided to share some of the stuff that was particularly interesting to me, with you.

Have fun!

Negative values lower than -1 may be used for grid-row-end and grid-column-end

In a lot of code examples and tutorials you will see that you can use grid-column-start:


A Collection of Interesting Facts about CSS Grid Layout is a post from CSS-Tricks

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4 Usability Testing Tools for Designers on a Budget

Have you ever encountered a website with confusing navigation? Been sent down the wrong path by misleading labels? Or needed your best detective skills to find a particular piece of content? It’s frustrating, isn’t it? What can companies do to ensure that users can find what they are looking for on a website? Usability testing […]

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​Edit your website, from your website

Stuck making “a few easy changes” to the website for someone? Component IO makes it quick and simple for you or your team to make edits (even for non-technical users).

You can manage content with a WYSIWYG editor or instantly update HTML, CSS, and JavaScript right from your website. Make changes faster, empower your team, and avoid redeployment bugs. Works with every web technology, from WordPress to Rails to React.

Join hundreds of projects already using Component IO, with …


​Edit your website, from your website is a post from CSS-Tricks

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Playing with Shadow DOM

About a year ago, Twitter announced it would start displaying embedded tweets with the shadow DOM rather than an <iframe>, if the browser supports shadom DOM?

Why? Well, speed is one reason.

They say:

Much lower memory utilization in the browser, and much faster render times. Tweets will appear faster and pages will scroll more smoothly, even when displaying multiple Tweets on the same page.

Why the choice? Why is it necessary to use either iframes or shadow DOM? …


Playing with Shadow DOM is a post from CSS-Tricks

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5 Things Users Want to Know Sooner Rather Than Later

When I go to any website, I’m looking for something. I may want to buy a product, or find information, or browse random memes, but whatever it is, I have a goal in mind. That goal could even be subconscious, but it’s there. Human beings never do anything without a reason. Whether or not they […]

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Implementing Webmentions

We get a decent amount of comments on blog posts right here on CSS-Tricks (thanks!), but I’d also say the hay day for that is over. These days, if someone writes some sort of reaction to a blog post, it could be on their own blog, or more likely, on some social media site. It makes sense. That’s their home base and it’s more useful to them to keep their words there.

It’s a shame, though. This fragmented conversation is …


Implementing Webmentions is a post from CSS-Tricks

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5 Unbreakable Rules for UI Animation on the Web

Transitions are a powerful way to communicate a change in a user interface. They can be used in apps to help offload a lot of the cognitive work into the visual cortex: they help transport users between navigational contexts, explain changes in the arrangement of elements on a screen, and reinforce element hierarchy. Consequently they […]

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